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  • While designed for students pursuing Associates of Arts and Science degrees, World Religions can be helpful to all students. Through the use of readings, guest speakers and videos, the student can expect to learn about the core values of religions and their concepts of creation, time and eternity. Some readings will be from primary documents. The course is focused on the exercise of inquiry and using the structure of argumentation to evaluate issues of power or empowerment and world foundations and processes. Students can also expect to write various styled essays. Spring
  • Students pursuing an Associate of Arts and Science degree will study western civilization from 1500 until the present. Knowledge of the geography and the interactions of those along the Atlantic coast are included. The student after reading the key writers and artwork will also understand various patterns of the mind that affect our living today.
  • HISTA 102 American History II—3 credits Students will survey American history from the end of the Civil War to the present. Topics included will be significant Supreme Court rulings; immigration conflicts and the processes of assimilation; explosion of white racism; development of reservations and 20th century internment camps; industrialization and oil development; the World Wars and Great Depression; the GI Bill; the Civil Rights and protest movements; the fear of communist expansion and ideology; influences of religion in American culture; secularization; how inventions changed the role of women; map work. Spring
  • Workplace Communications in WP

  • Students pursuing an Associate of Arts and Science degree will study western civilization from the beginnings of art, law, literature and religion in Mesopotamia; Greek philosophy, drama and comedy; Roman engineering, infrastructure, poetry and orators; the trading routes and poetry of the Vikings. We will watch as medieval cathedrals are built and how church and Renaissance arts organized the minds of the people. Then we will note how the world expanded with piracy and exploration into the sixteenth century. Map work will be included to  understand the impact of geography upon these regions. The student upon completion of this course will also understand how our origins have created patterns of the mind that still affect us today.

  • This is a survey course of evolving American Literature from 1492 through 1865. Literature will be also viewed as a reflection of the historical processes of the time and will help us to analyze and understand the formation of our American identity. 

  • This course is a comprehensive introduction of American history from colonial times through the Revolution, Jeffersonian and Jackson democracies to the Civil War era. The purpose of the course is to broaden the students’ knowledge of the beginning our country’s history in all its complexities, struggles, violence, inconsistencies, greed, failings/atrocities, hopes, triumphs and evolving identity. Indeed the questions we have to answer are “What did we do?” “Why did we do that?” “Who are we”?

  • This course will study the creative endeavors of man. We will study select artifacts of the world and why they are significant. We will use the BBC and British Museum's text History of the World in 100 Objects. Map work will be included. A paper will be written about the Renaissance or Impressionist art and the serious listening of an opera will be included with a written description.

  • Students are introduced to project managment.  This course studies the application of project management concepts, skills, tools and techniques; as well as, the role projects play within an organization, and the elements critical to the success of a project.

  • Anyone entering the business field should take this course. Students can expect to acquire decision-making skills that will help them work with others in a professional manner, manage and organize their work, and manage other employees. Business concepts that are emphasized are key core skill areas, including decision-making and planning, teamwork, technology and communication. Students will demonstrate their comprehension of core concepts through class discussions, quizzes, summary papers and tests. Fall.

  • Human
    Services majors will complete a supervised experience in a human services
    agency or related field just prior to graduating.  Students will establish a contract with a
    community agency and have the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills
    developed in their academic training.  In
    addition, students will establish effective working relationships within the
    Human Services arena.  Students will also
    evaluate their growth from this field experience. 

  • This course emphasizes shop safety and basic fundamentals of automotive industry tools, equipment and an introduction to the evolution of the modern automobile.

  • This is an introduction into the basics of Moodle. Expected outcomes are user's ability to navigate the site without issues, load course related materials into the appropriate section. Customize thier home page and administer users.

  • Students will learn poses and theory behind the practice of yoga.

  • Students follow step by step lessons, which enable them to quickly and efficiently learn the features of Microsoft Excel and how to use them in the workplace. This Microsoft Official Academic Course offers friendly, straightforward instruction with a focus on real-world business scenarios. Dynamic Interactive tutorials from the MIcrosoft eLearning Library are included. Skills covered in the book correspond to the objectives tested on the Microsoft Office Specialist Excel examination.

    Spring

  • Students are re-introduced to keyboarding and to basic computer tasks using Windows, typing with a word processor, navigating the web and working with email. Major topics covered include the basics of using Windows 7 and the Documents library and Word features such as AutoCorrect, Copy and Paste, browsing the web with Internet Explorer and sending/receiving email.

    Fall, Spring

  • Students are introduced to the Internet. This course provides clear, comprehensive instruction on the basics of computer literacy --geared toward a non-technical audience. The Internet requires skills and know how that can only be acquired through hands-on / online experiences.

    Spring

  • Students are provided the most basic features of MS PowerPoint as well as the more advanced tools that all students find useful.  Additionally, this course introduces new features exclusive to MS PowerPoint, as well as includes detailed instructions on how to use them.  Students will learn their way around the toolbars and menus, basic editing features, how to create visually dynamic presentations using individual slides and display them as a slide show on the computer, a video projector, or over the internet. 

    Spring

  • Students are introduced to the most basic features of MS Word as well as the more advanced tools that all students find useful.  Additionally, this course introduces new features exclusive to MS Word, as well as includes detailed instructions on how to use them. You'll learn your way around the toolbars and menus, basic editing features, how to insert items into a document, how to create and edit tables, and much more.

    Spring

  • Students are introduced to the most basic features of MS Excel as well as the more advanced tools that all students will find useful.  Additionally, this course introduces new features exclusive to MS Excel, as well as includes detailed instructions on how to use them. You'll learn your way around the toolbars and menus, basic editing features, how to insert items into a spreadsheet, how to create and edit charts, and much more.

    Spring

  • Students must be able to demonstrate basic user computer skills to enroll in this course. Students with no computer skills should enroll in CP 095. For any student wishing to learn workplace competencies and basic skills through hands-on application of an integrated software suite, this course will be useful in their academic and professional lives. The suite includes word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics. Students will create, edit, manipulate and format basic documents and learn desktop publishing methods in the word processing program. Students will also demonstrate proficiency in the use of computerized spreadsheets including function formulas, filtering, and data analysis, and making charts. In addition, database software will be used to create, store, retrieve, query, filter, and analyze data while the presentation application will allow the student to express ideas using text, graphics, sound and video clips and create slides, outlines, speaker’s notes, and audience handouts. Lesson projects, critical thinking activities, and realistic, comprehensive simulations are used to assess student learning.

    Fall, Spring
  • Students follow step by step lessons, which enable students to quickly and efficiently learn the features of Microsoft Access and how to use them in the workplace. This Microsoft Official Academic Course offers friendly, straightforward instruction with a focus on real-world business scenarios. Dynamic interactive tutorials from the Microsoft eLearning Library are included. Skills covered in the book correspond to the objectives tested on the Microsoft Office Specialist Access examination.

    Fall

  • Students are introduced to computer programming where they will learn the fundamental concepts and terminology of software
    application development and develop skills in designing and writing simple computer programs. Students will be able to
    become familiar with programming concepts and methods common to all computer languages. Students will understand how
    to design simple applications, control structures, functions/procedures, arrays, classes, and objects

    fall

  • Students are provided an overview of the latest operating systems (OS); including Mac, Linux, and the Windows environment they can build upon.  This course helps prepare the student to install, configure, implement, administer, and troubleshoot information systems that incorporate a graphical user interface (GUI), and measures their ability to provide technical support. Projects and exercises reinforce skills as they are acquired. 

    Spring

  • In this course, you will learn about computers and the various elements that make up the computing world. You will first explore what a computer is and how computers began. You will then become familiar with a computer’s hardware and software. In addition, you will be exposed to the various ways to use a computer efficiently such as with file management and digital devices. You will also learn about the other elements that make up the computing world such as the Internet, networking, social networking and security. In addition, the process of developing an information system and reviewing the tools used to create the system are discussed. Fall, Spring
  • Students are provided the knowledge and skills necessary to troubleshoot basic problems end users will face while running
    Microsoft Windows in an Active Directory® network environment or in a workgroup environment. This course provides an
    overview of operating system concepts and how to troubleshoot Windows Client Software. Students will gain experience in
    working with people, diagnosing systems, repairing systems, as well as proper policy and procedure when working a help desk
    in a business environment. (Formally CT 104)
    Fall

    Fall

  • Students, who are new to Microsoft Windows Client Software, are provided the knowledge and skills necessary to troubleshoot basic problems end users will face while  running Microsoft Windows Client Software in an Active Directory® network environment or in a workgroup environment.  Work at your own pace through the lessons and lab exercises utilizing the Microsoft IT Academy Online courses.  This is the second course in
    the Microsoft Certified Enterprise Desktop Support Technician curriculum.  This course is intended for new entrants and career changers new to the IT industry. They will gain experience using Microsoft Office and basic Microsoft Windows navigation skills.

    Spring

  • Students will be provided the knowledge required to understand the fundamentals of computer technology, networking, and
    security. Students will be able to identify basic terms, concepts, and functions of computing system components, including
    how each component should work during normal operation and the boot process; common peripheral ports, associated cabling
    and their connectors; hardware methods or upgrading system performance. Student will acquire the skills to analyze common 76
    symptoms and problems associated with each component and provide solutions to troubleshoot and isolate the problems.
    Students will learn to analyze issues, procedures and devices for protection within the computing environment, including
    people, hardware and the surrounding workspace. (Formally CT 107 & 108)
    Fall

  • Students will acquire the skills required to install, configure, upgrade, and maintain PC workstations, the Windows OS and SOHO networks.  The successful candidate will utilize troubleshooting techniques and tools to effectively and efficiently resolve PC, OS, and network connectivity issues and implement security practices.  Job titles in some organizations, which are descriptive of the role of this individual, may be Enterprise technician, IT administrator, field service technician, PC or Support technician, etc.  In order to receive CompTIA A+ certification a candidate must pass two exams.  The CompTIA A+ Essentials, exam number 220-801 and the CompTIA A+ 220-802 exam, Practical Application. This course helps prepare students for passing the software portion of both CompTIA A+ service technician exams.

    Spring

  • Students are provided with a broad knowledge of computer server networking, hardware, and software. This course is one of 3 courses required for the Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate: Windows Server 2008 Administrator certification. Work at your own pace through the lessons and lab exercises utilizing the Microsoft IT Academy Online courses. Focusing on Windows Server 2008, this course covers topics such as configuring Active Directory, configuring user environments by using Group Policy Objects, implement security features by using group policy. 

    Spring

  • Students continue working with computer server networking, hardware, and software. This course is one of 3 courses required for the Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate: Windows Server 2008 Administrator certification. This course teaches the core concepts of configuring a Windows Server Network Infrastructure. Work at your own pace through the lessons and lab exercises utilizing the Microsoft IT Academy Online courses. This course focuses on Windows Server 2008, and covers topics such as implementing TCP/IPv4 addressing and address spaces,
    administrative functions of Windows Server 2008, implementing security and Windows Firewall, DNS, DHCP, routing and remote access, and Active directory.

    Fall

  • Students work at their own pace through the lessons and lab exercises utilizing the Microsoft IT Academy Online courses. This course is one of 3 courses required for the Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate: Windows Server 2008 Administrator certification. A server administrator is responsible for the operations and day-to-day management of an infrastructure of Windows Server 2008 R2 servers for an enterprise organization. Windows server administrators manage the infrastructure, Web, and IT application servers. The Windows server administrators use scripts and batch files written by others or those that they occasionally write themselves to accomplish tasks on a regular basis. They conduct most server management tasks remotely by using Remote Desktop Server or administration tools installed on their local workstation. A server administrator’s primary tasks include:

    • Managing the server operating system, file, and directory services
    • Software distribution and updates
    • Profiling and monitoring assigned servers
    • Troubleshooting

    Spring

  • Students are provided with a technician's critical knowledge of media and topologies, protocols and standards, network
    implementation and network support. Students will be able to define and distinguish network terminology; identify functions of
    the OSI and TCP/IP reference models and related protocols. Students will be able to define and describe network hardware
    devices, topologies, IP addressing, subnetting, and network operating systems. (Formally CT 211)
    Fall Course

  • This is the second half of the CompTIA Network+ course.  This Network course is designed to provide a student with a technician's critical knowledge of media and topologies, protocols and standards, network implementation and network support.  The CompTIA Network+ certification is the sign of a competent networking professional. It is an international, vendor-neutral certification that proves a technician’s competency in managing, maintaining, troubleshooting, installing and configuring basic network infrastructure. 

    Spring

  • Students are introduced to the entire Web site creation process by developing and enhancing their HTML, CSS, and visual design skills utilizing the latest Web design technologies and trends. Beginning with the Web design environment and the principles of sound Web design, students will plan site layout and navigation, progress to Web typography, colors and images, and working with CSS.  Students will gain a solid foundation of designing successful, standards-based Web sites that are portable across different operating systems, browsers, and Web devices.  Web design exercises are completed using the latest Microsoft applications.

    Spring

  • Students are provided a comprehensive coverage in all areas of Adobe® Illustrator including fundamental concepts and progressing to in-depth exploration of the software’s full set of features.  Students work through real-world projects step-by-step, with guidance through the entire process. Students acquire the skills to pursue the Adobe Certified Associate Certification.

    Fall

  • Students are introduced to graphics concepts and principles with an overview of Photoshop image manipulation features. Students work with digital image types and file formats; manipulating images and workspace; extracting objects; working with layers and masks; adding text to images; using painting tools; retouching images; color management; applying filters and styles; and creating images for the Web. Students acquire the skills to pursue the Adobe Certified Associate Certification.  

    Spring

  • Students are presented an in-depth, design-driven introduction to Adobe’s animation and multimedia software program.  Students learn primary applications of the program; graphics, animation, interactive authoring, and audio and video integration; working with drawing and painting tools; objects, types, symbols, layers, buttons and sounds.  Students create animation and interactive movies; importing sounds, images, videos and artwork. Students acquire the skills to pursue the Adobe Certified Associate Certification. 

    Fall

  • Students are introduced to an in-depth, comprehensive coverage in page layout design.  It can be used to create works such as posters, flyers, brochures, magazines, newspapers and books. Adobe InDesign software lets you design engaging page layouts for print or digital distribution with built-in creative tools and precise control over typography. Students will learn to integrate interactivity, video, and audio for playback. Students acquire the skills to pursue the Adobe Certified Associate Certification. 

    Spring

  • Students are provided the essentials of website planning and design; creating a website; text manipulation; hyperlinks and appearance; working with pictures; creating a table; creating web pages with frames; creating a form; inserting sound and video; working with layers; managing website assets; working with user-defined styles; using behaviors to build interactive pages; publishing and finalizing a website.  Students acquire the skills to pursue the Adobe Certified Associate Certification.

    Fall

  • Students complete a capstone project for computer science / information technology students. It involves investigation of a topic to be selected individually by the student, and approved by a faculty mentor. The topic will be complementary to the field of computer science / information technology. This project will demonstrate mastery of the CT curriculum and documented in the student’s portfolio. Final project must be approved by instructor. Course may be repeated. 

    Fall, Spring

  • This course prepares prospective teachers and students interested in careers in human services. By guiding the student to explore and construct knowledge of human behavior, especially learning behavior, this course offers the student methods to improve learning outcomes. To add depth and breadth to the learning experience, course participants engage the course content through lecture, video, group discussion and structured team interactions, while enjoying an opportunity for a service learning/field experience. The student investigates theories that explain contextually how and why human learning takes place, and develops pedagogy to individualize education
  • Students will learn basic electrical systems including generation, transmission, distribution, and metering; identify and describe the functions of various electrical apparatus. Equipment, protective gear, materials, tools and construction methods will be taught and reinforced in the lab. Students will learn what employers expect regarding safety behavior and customer services. The course will also teach safe working loads for rigging applications, expose students to various rigging configurations that would require them to calculate actual strains and stresses applied to ropes and blocks using the formulas learned in the classroom and lab. Summer. Course Fee $40.00.

  • This is where the course description goes

  • This is an introductory course for students with an interest in psychology. Students will learn the pat, present and future of psychology. Student will also learn to apply knowledge gained through self-inventories. In addition, students will demonstrate knowledge of human behavior in all aspects of life and define the scientific method and its application to psychology.
  • Second-year Chemical Addiction Studies students will gain a comprehensive understanding and application of addiction counseling, current therapeutic trends, strategies, and modalities used in addiction disorders, to facilitate the development of addiction counseling competencies associated with positive treatment outcomes, and increase students competence relative to providing addiction evaluation, education and treatment services. Emphasis will be placed on developing and practicing addiction counseling skills. Students will be introduced to different theoretical models and explore a variety of treatment approaches through videos, lecture, and journaling in an experiential project. Can be taken concurrently with CAS 250.
  • Second year Chemical Addiction Studies and Human Services majors will be introduced to assessment, evaluation, and case management procedures. Outcomes include a demonstrated ability to understand, describe, administer and interpret the various testing and evaluation tools used in human services and addiction counseling. A thorough review of intervention strategies and the importance of documentation are also incorporated into lecture and classroom activities including completion of a comprehensive case file on an identified case study subject. For Addiction Studies students, this class can be taken concurrently with CAS 242.

  • This is an introductory course for students with an interest in psychology. Students will learn the past, present and future of psychology. Students will also learn to apply knowledge gained through self-inventories. In addition, students will demonstrate knowledge of human behavior in all aspects of life and define the scientific method and its application to psychology.

    Offered: Fall, Spring

  • This course focuses on exploring the types of career opportunities that are available for psychology and human service majors with baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral degrees.  Students will learn to identify skills and aptitudes that are associated with particular types of occupations, specifically those locally

     Offered: Fall/ Prerequisites: None

  • Psychology majors will receive an introduction to the design and analysis of social science research. Outcomes for this course include an understanding of the logic and philosophy of psychological research, conceptualizing research questions, hypothesis testing, data collection and analysis strategies used by researchers in the social sciences, and the use of statistical software for analysis.
  • Second year students will study human growth from conception to adolescence including physical, cognitive, personality, and social development. In addition, students will examine the applications, theories and latest research data in this area. Students will gain hands-on knowledge of child development by completing several out-of-class observations.

  • Second year students will examine current data on adult aging and development.  Students will learn to identify physical, intellectual, emotional, and social developmental issues related to the aging adult.  In
    addition, students will discuss multicultural aspects of adult development. This course will be delivered as a Blended Course—utilizing distance learning and Moodle for assignments, tests, and discussions.

  • This is an introductory course for students with an interest in Sociology. Students will learn to explain and apply sociological concepts and theories. Students will also learn to explain and apply disciplinary methods, including types of questions asked by sociologists and methods used to explore those questions.

    Fall

  • Beginning students may enroll in this class to increase their understanding and enjoyment of literature and as preparation for higher-level literature courses. Students will read, analyze, discuss, and write about literature, both classic and multi-cultural, in the genres of short fiction, poetry, and drama. They will learn to implement literary terminology and to integrate information from various cultures and historical periods. Fall, Spring.

  • Drawing from several federal, state and tribal archival documents, as well as from other reliable individual accounts, historic documents and books, this course is a comprehensive documented history of the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. This survey history course presents an interdisciplinary perspective of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation from pre-1800 to 2000. Along with the Assiniboine and Sioux, students will study and learn important contributions and relationships regarding various other tribal groups and non-Indians represented and living on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation.

  • "Federal Indian law," as it is called in the cases and statutes, is a framework imposed by the United States government for its own purposes on peoples who were present before the United States and who are still present. In this context, the difference between "American Indian" and "Native-American" is nonexistent. Both are names given by outsiders. There are no American Indians or Native Americans. There are many different peoples, hundreds, bearing their own names.

    "Legalization" is a name for the process of incorporating into a legal system that which exists outside and independent of the system. "Legalization of American Indians" means the process by which United States law reached the lives of peoples who were in existence prior to that law.

    The Western system of government by law is the product of long and bloody struggles among the peoples who came to colonize this land and later imposed "federal Indian law" on the indigenous peoples. Some say the system developed into its present form by incorporating information indigenous peoples offered to the colonists. In any event, the legal system that created "federal Indian law" did not come full-blown into the world. It has a history and that history is still happening. A study of the "legalization of American Indians" sheds light on that history as it is intertwined with the ongoing histories of the indigenous peoples to whom it is directed. (P. d’ Errico 2001).

  • This course is designed for students who are interested in United States Indian history, and for those who are pursuing a degree in American Indian Studies and/or Education. This course will acquaint the student with the diverse scope of Native history in the United States. It presents an interdisciplinary perspective drawing from several fields of study (history, anthropology, archeology, sociology, religion, linguistics art and literature). Students will study and learn important aspects regarding various tribal groups representing major geographical regions of the United States, and their interactions with emigrant Europeans and subsequent Americans. In addition. This course utilizes a variety of media to introduce more definitive and elaborate instruction regarding the immense impact of colonization and contemporary work to decolonize education and general media and literature, and acknowledge different ways of knowing and being.

  • This is a survey course designed to acquaint the student with no previous experience in American Indian Studies, with the variety and scope of the Native American cultures in North America. It presents an interdisciplinary perspective drawing from several fields of study (e.g. history, anthropology, archeology, sociology, religion, linguistics, art and literature). Students will study and learn important aspects regarding various tribal groups representing major geographical regions of North America.

  • Introduction to American Indian Studies Course Description:  This is a general survey course designed to acquaint students with no previous experience in American Indian Studies with the variety and scope of the Native tradition in North American.  It presents an interdisciplinary perspective drawing from several field of study (archaeology, sociology, religion, linguistics, art, and literature).  Students will study various tribal groups representing major geographical regions in North America. 

  • Students will study the foundations of effective communications and will learn the stages of speech preparation, organization, delivery and the various types of public speaking opportunities. Informative and persuasive speaking will be emphasized. At least four speeches will be prepared and presented by students. Upon completion of this course, students will have the confidence to speak in public effectively to support issues and present ideas and information in a variety of speaking situations. Fall, Spring.

  • To study the foundations of effective communcation and learn the stages of effective speech preparation.

  • Students need to upgrade their writing techniques in preparation for college writing.

  • An introduction to essay writing, this course focuses on the writing process and includes such skills as generating ideas, writing and revising drafts. Students will learn to write and support thesis statements. They will practice active reading and write journal reactions in response to assigned readings. In addition to free writing and journal entries, they will write and revise at least four word-processed papers. Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to read and think critically, write effectively at the college level in a variety of methods and genres, and communicate at a higher level. Placement will be based on ASSET scores, and students will complete a writing sample at the beginning of the course. Fall. 

  • Course covers writing methods for college students.

  • Students who enroll in the Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degree programs should take this course to develop a foundation in writing skills necessary for college-level academics. During this course, they will become more efficient with the writing process, write well-organized papers, implement citation and documentation in research, judge the validity of research information according to criteria, and evaluate the effectiveness of written work. They will write at least six word-processed papers, with at least one assigned research paper written in MLA style. Placement recommendation for writing courses is based on ASSET placement test scores. Students will complete an in-class writing sample during the first week to confirm class placement. Fall, Spring.

  • For students who plan on seeking an advanced degree need to complete this level class.

  • Students who plan to seek a bachelor’s level degree need to enroll in this sophomore-level class. They will read critically from diverse fields, analyzing the ideas, writing styles, and strategies of the various authors. They will complete in-depth writing assignments that demonstrate critical thinking and employ such techniques as argumentation, analysis, and illustration, demonstrating competency in editing and revising their own work. They will write at least six word-processed papers, with at least one assignment a research paper written in MLA or APA style. Prerequisite: WRIT 101. Spring.

  • This is an intermediate course in reading and writing short fiction. Students can expect to write four short stories of literary quality.

  • Vocational students learn how to communicate effectively in the workplace.

  • This is a required course that will help students write more efficiently, writing well-organized papers with strong introductions, logical development and conclusions, using citations and a works cited page. Students will write at least four word processed papers, plus one research paper in MLA style.